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biodiverseed:

After a cursory search, I realised I couldn’t find a single easy table online where USDA Hardiness Zones and AHS Heat Zones were pictured together, easily readable, and in centigrade. So, I made one, using the charts available on wikipedia.
Feel free to download, share, and use on your website.
Knowing which climactic zone you are in is vital to choosing the right plants for your garden. There are a number of other factors to consider, of course, such as rainfall, soil, snow cover, drainage, acidity/alkalinity, altitude, and latitude, but many of those factors can be manipulated either with labour, or the creation of microclimates.
#bioregionalism #garden science #infographics



Omg thank you, this is a really important pair of charts. I am so tired of explaining to garden center customers that the plant may indeed be perennial for our cold-hardiness zone but not in our heat-tolerance zone. Which is much harder to circumvent, I think.

biodiverseed:

After a cursory search, I realised I couldn’t find a single easy table online where USDA Hardiness Zones and AHS Heat Zones were pictured together, easily readable, and in centigrade. So, I made one, using the charts available on wikipedia.

Feel free to download, share, and use on your website.

Knowing which climactic zone you are in is vital to choosing the right plants for your garden. There are a number of other factors to consider, of course, such as rainfall, soil, snow cover, drainage, acidity/alkalinity, altitude, and latitude, but many of those factors can be manipulated either with labour, or the creation of microclimates.

#bioregionalism #garden science #infographics

Omg thank you, this is a really important pair of charts. I am so tired of explaining to garden center customers that the plant may indeed be perennial for our cold-hardiness zone but not in our heat-tolerance zone. Which is much harder to circumvent, I think.

samiholloway sent: I saw that you have Vitex seeds? Are you still looking for homes for them? I'm having to rebuild my seed collection so I don't have anything to swap, but I'll grow them with love! And any other ones you have, if you're looking! Thank you!

Yep, I have two little Vitex agnus-castus trees growing, so you’re welcome to some of the seeds!  Just give me a destination, and I’ll find a good way to mail the little berries.  (I don’t think they’re invasive but I hear some states have pretty strict agriculture rules so try not to get me arrested xD)

I also have a big bag of vegetable and herb seed packets I haven’t used yet because I’m slightly nuts like that, if you or anyone wants any more miscellaneous things for your collection.  If I have time I intend to try and list them over at biodiverseed's seed swap… don’t y’all get your hopes too high for a list though because alas, time is in short supply for me right now.  Definitely check out the seed swap either way, some more-organized people are giving away seeds there too :D

mollyccostello:

"The Garden at Night"

mollyccostello:

"The Garden at Night"

(Source: sarahmaladroit)

lacoumeille:

Making mouthwash. I was asked to make this for a sufferer of recurring gingivitis that won’t clear up, despite antibiotics. I’m working with sage/sauge, mint/menthe and the roots of wood avens/benoîte. Sage is antibacterial, antiseptic and antimicrobial, the mint is also antiseptic and analgesic, helping make it more palatable. The wood avens root is a traditional french plant for mouth problems, often used to treat mouth infections,  ulcers, abscesses and swellings. It’s astringent action reduces swelling and helps close the gap between the gums and teeth. It has a taste a little like cloves. I’m making both a strong decoction and a tincture form and adding a little Camargue salt to the mouthwash.

lacoumeille:

Making mouthwash. I was asked to make this for a sufferer of recurring gingivitis that won’t clear up, despite antibiotics. I’m working with sage/sauge, mint/menthe and the roots of wood avens/benoîte. Sage is antibacterial, antiseptic and antimicrobial, the mint is also antiseptic and analgesic, helping make it more palatable. The wood avens root is a traditional french plant for mouth problems, often used to treat mouth infections,  ulcers, abscesses and swellings. It’s astringent action reduces swelling and helps close the gap between the gums and teeth. It has a taste a little like cloves. I’m making both a strong decoction and a tincture form and adding a little Camargue salt to the mouthwash.

im gonna go to bed at ten tonight
—someone who did not go to bed at ten and never will (via letsmakeloaf)

biodiverseed:

mimi-the-cat:

オキナワスズメウリ。

チビのスイカみたいで可愛い(≧▽≦)

http://mimi-the-cat.tumblr.com

http://sparklingcat.blog6.fc2.com/

Some google translate and wikipedia work has informed me this is Diplocyclos palmatus (Native Bryony), or maybe something else in the Bryonia genus. I’m not a botanist, so if someone more qualified wants to jump in that’d be great.

I want to know:

A) Is it eaten, or used for medicine, or both? There seem to be some scientific or pharmocological interest in it, but it’s also a gourd.

B) Where / how does it grow?

C) Is this one the invasive “Lollipop Climber”?

Aw, well I can confirm that OP captioned it in Japanese as Okinawa Suzume-uri, which is used in Chinese medicine iirc, but I don’t know what all for. I don’t think you usually eat it. (I guess Bryonopsis laciniosa, which is the name I find for Okinawa Suzume-uri, is the same as Diplocyclos palmatus. I wish a botanist would come explain why they do this.) Suzume Uri is the cutest name, though. Sparrow Melon! (Or gourd)
burdockandrose:

Market harvest. #farmersmarkets #summer #blessed

burdockandrose:

Market harvest. #farmersmarkets #summer #blessed

kaargue:

escape!!

wildcritterfarms:

These are pictures I took of my brother’s garden while I was visiting him in Anchorage, AK.  The temperatures don’t climb crazy high there - but the number of daylight hours do.