back to top

The watermelon harvest has begun. :D

ruthhopkins:

Purple coneflowers, Sully’s Hill National Park, Spirit Lake Reservation.

ruthhopkins:

Purple coneflowers, Sully’s Hill National Park, Spirit Lake Reservation.

kcyang688:

:)

kcyang688:

:)

If you look up at the sunflowers you almost can’t see all the buildings.

If you look up at the sunflowers you almost can’t see all the buildings.

deernationherbs:

Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) ~ Photo taken by Adrian WhiteConsidered an invasive, pesky weed to conventional, chemical-spraying corn farmers in Iowa, ironically this healing herb springs up among the diabetes and cancer-creating crops, the effects of such it has been known to remedy.  It has been traditionally used to stave off some of the most degenerative diseases for centuries, and now today, it grows right alongside the corn that gives us “High Fructose Corn Syrup” and may be one of our best allies against it.Red clover is an incomparable alterative, used in alternative therapy support for cancers, cancerous tumors, diabetes, and even as protection against the radiation produced by Chemo treatments.-Adrian White, Deer Nation Herbalist ~ Visit: www.deernationherbs.com

deernationherbs:

Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) ~ Photo taken by Adrian White

Considered an invasive, pesky weed to conventional, chemical-spraying corn farmers in Iowa, ironically this healing herb springs up among the diabetes and cancer-creating crops, the effects of such it has been known to remedy.  It has been traditionally used to stave off some of the most degenerative diseases for centuries, and now today, it grows right alongside the corn that gives us “High Fructose Corn Syrup” and may be one of our best allies against it.

Red clover is an incomparable alterative, used in alternative therapy support for cancers, cancerous tumors, diabetes, and even as protection against the radiation produced by Chemo treatments.

-Adrian White, Deer Nation Herbalist ~ Visit: www.deernationherbs.com

jackassgardener:

When is it okay to harvest bell peppers?


Well, if they’ve already changed color they should be plenty ripe enough (if there’s an official way to tell when they’re done I’ve never known it).  I do know they get sweeter as they change colors, but if you let them stay on the plant too long after they finish changing colors they start to kinda shrivel up and don’t taste as good :((if you are reading this and know the secret of bell pepper harvest times please share your knowledge with us :)

jackassgardener:

When is it okay to harvest bell peppers?

Well, if they’ve already changed color they should be plenty ripe enough (if there’s an official way to tell when they’re done I’ve never known it).  I do know they get sweeter as they change colors, but if you let them stay on the plant too long after they finish changing colors they start to kinda shrivel up and don’t taste as good :(

(if you are reading this and know the secret of bell pepper harvest times please share your knowledge with us :)

The court affirmed the bedrock principle that the state cannot insert itself into a private transaction between consenting adults to buy a natural product, or interfere with the type of foods that a parent might choose to nourish their family with.

"Judge Dismisses Charge Against Minnesota Raw-Milk Farmer Despite Probation Violations"

Now if only we could apply this precedent to so many other issues…

(via hipsterlibertarian)

Freaking thank you.  Can you all in Minnesota just promote that judge or something.

By all means break the rules, and break them beautifully, deliberately and well.
—Robert Bringhurst  (via awelltraveledwoman)

(Source: bocrede)

Herb garden updates part two:

The sage, woolly lamb’s ear, trailing rosemary and lemon verbena box, with bonus butterfly bush that needs to be moved. The sage is doing great except for one or two branches that are mysteriously dead so I’m going to cut them off.

The other box has the bee balm, lemon balm, chamomile and a curry plant. Unfortunately most of those belonged in the shade and after the loss of tree they’re getting full sun. The kale and carrots are also crowding them. It’s the bee balm that’s growing so well I had to get in close to see the melissa and chamomile hiding behind their big sister.

Finally a little herb spiral for the poor straggly survivors of the tree attack. My partner built this to surprise me because I wanted one, not out of any knowledge of which herbs go where, so I will probably have to do more rearranging. They seem quite happy to be planted though :)

Stubbornly still alive here we have some German thyme, English thyme, Italian oregano, lots of rosemary, yarrows, sweet basil, Greek basil, marjoram, once-purple sage and Mexican bush sage. Plus succulents.

(Not making it are the poor crunched fennel and the Mexican oregano. It dried out while waiting to be transplanted… again. The stevia is barely hanging on)

It’s just a little one but I am so excited to finally have this herb area for all my tiny herblings.